Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

hank perry photographs a mother grizzly bear and her triplets in alaska’s katmai national park. describing the shoot, he noted, “the tide was out, the sand was blowing, and the wind had some rain in it — not perfect for photography.”

"two hours elapsed as we waited and the cubs played, while their mom dug hundreds of clams up. after nursing the cubs while keeping a watchful eye on both us and her surroundings, but feeling comfortable with us, she bed them down for a nap, shielding them from the wind, rain, and flooding tide for a brief moment of rest."

Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

to mark world theatre day, held on march 27, one hundred young syrians from jordan’s zaatari refugee camp acted in an adapted production of king lear. the play — which tells a story of exile, of a ruler losing touch with reality, and of a land divided by rival groups — was directed was nawar bulbul (third photo), a popular syrian actor who fled his country after appearing in anti government protests.

"i wanted to show that these children are not worthless …that they have something real to contribute." he said. “the show is meant to bring back laughter, joy and humanity” and "help [the children] express themselves." the kids — all under the age of fifteen — were actively involved in the costuming, for example.

many of the children cried when they heard the applause of onlookers at the play’s end. said one child, “i do not feel lonely any more in this place.” their parents described the project as a rare point of light in a bleak camp existence. after the show, they boasted of their children’s talent.

the production, months in the planning, was also meant to help counteract the effects of a war that has caused young syrians to miss vital years of education. about 60,000 of the refugees at the zaatari camp are younger than eighteen, and fewer than a quarter regularly attend school. many fear the war is creating a lost generation of children.

photos are by warrick page for the new york times and jared kohler for unhcr. for more on syria’s refugee crisis, see #withsyria, care international, oxfam syria crisis appeal, human care syria and free syrian voices

(it’s interesting to note that shakespeare actually mentions the city of aleppo in mabeth, which serves as a reminder that syria is one of our oldest centers of civilization.)

Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

"well, i don’t know what will happen now. we’ve got some difficult days ahead. but it really doesn’t matter with me now, because i’ve been to the mountaintop. …like anybody, i would like to live a long life. but I’m not concerned about that now. …i’ve seen the promised land. i may not get there with you. but i want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land."

king delivered these words at mason temple in memphis, tennessee the very night before his assassination. he was in memphis to support 1300 striking sanitation workers, largely african american, who were protesting difficult working conditions, poverty level wages and the refusal of the city to recognize their union.

although jim crow was now technically abolished, it was still very difficult for african americans to find work in the south, and for many in memphis collecting garbage was the only job they could get. but work was hard and unsafe. workers would come home with clothes saturated with filthy water and crawling with maggots. and when it rained, workers could only seek refuge in the back of their compressor trucks.

this would lead to the death of echol cole and robert walker, who were accidentally crushed during a storm. their deaths would precipitate the strike. as one striker, taylor rogers, later recalled, “if you bend your back, people will ride your back. but if you stand up straight, people can’t ride your back. so that’s what we did. we stood up straight and said, ‘I AM A MAN’.”

and so king, despite the wishes of some confidants, went to memphis in the midst of his poor people’s campaign to stand with the sanitation workers. as he said the night before his death, “we’ve got to march and force everybody to see that there are thirteen hundred of god’s children here suffering.”

because, as king famously said, “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” be it political or racial or economic injustice. the promised land was not only a voting rights act or a civil rights act. it was also the right to organize (including public sector employees), a living wage, and basic decency.

and as king said, “if you haven’t found something in life that you’re willing to die for, you’ve not yet lived.” though he didn’t live to see it, the strike eventually ended with union recognition from the city and raises for the workers, but not before king’s now widowed wife, coretta scott king, defied the threats to her own life and marched in her late husband’s place on april 8.

photos by (click pic) jack thornell, richard l. copley, charlie kelly and sam melhorn.

Photoset

Akira Kurosawa — 1993.

(Source: kurosawa-akira, via surrenderthepink)

Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

"i had spent about three months with this cheetah mum and her cubs. it is hard to describe the love and affection of a cheetah mother and her young. the daily challenges to bring her offspring to adulthood is amazing." — ken dyball in kenya’s masai mara

Photoset

wiinterquay:

Happy International Women’s Day!

(via ausseratem)

Photoset
Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

where more than 100,000 wild tigers roamed the forests and grasslands of asia as recently as 100 years ago, today less than 3,200 tigers remain, and of those, less than a third are breeding females. though they’re quickly disappearing from the region, their presence dates back millions of years. all modern cats originated in southeast asia.

the causes of the decline are varied: the illegal wildlife trade, where poachers earn tens of thousands of dollars per tiger selling their parts for use in traditional asian medicines; humans over hunting the tiger’s natural prey; and human encroachment on their lands, leaving tigers only tiny pockets of isolated territory and forcing them into human contact. tigers now occupy only seven percent of their historic range.

steve winter has spent a decade in search of the remaining wild tigers, from myanmar’s leech infested jungles to the forbidden realm of poachers in sumatra, in the hopes of not only documenting the majestic animals but spuring global concern through his images. the photos have now been published in “tigers forever: saving the world’s most endangered big cat,” created in collaboration with panthera, the world’s largest big cat conservation organization.

the group’s mission is to increase tiger numbers by 50 percent throughout asia over a ten year period. only six tiger subspecies remain: bengal, indochinese, malayan, sumatran, siberian, and the south-china, which exists only in captivity. all are endangered. the last cambodian tiger died out in 2010, following the extinction of the javan and caspian tigers in the 1970s and the bali tiger in the 1940s.

in contrast, at least 5,000 captive tigers are privately owned in the united states, where a patchwork of lax federal laws and little to no state mandated regulatory oversight has fulled the black market trade in body parts and meant the animals often live miserable, permanently caged lives. (nature of things documentary, “the american tiger”)

Link

In the latest issue of Visual Studies.

My favorite part? This line:
Timothy Shortell and Jerome Krase offer a particularly strong and clear methodological essay in ‘On the Visual Semiotics of Collective Identity in Urban Vernacular Spaces’.”

Photoset

awkwardsituationist:

photos by mathieu bélanger in lac saint-jean, quebec. canada is home to around 15,000 of the estimated 20,000 polar bears in the world. according to the u.s. geological survey, polar bear populations, given current global warming trends, could see a decline of two thirds by 2050 as a shrinking arctic icepack restricts their offshore hunting range.